Holy Cross Anglican Church Hackett

Following Jesus and building community in Canberra’s Inner North

Category: Mindfulness

Retreat in Daily Life

A “Retreat in Daily Life” gives you a special opportunity to draw closer to God in your personal prayer at home, by following a set pattern of prayerful meditations on Scripture passages over several days. Our Retreat in Daily Life will be drawing on the wisdom of Ignatius of Loyola, the founder of Ignatian spirituality.

The Retreat in Daily Life has been designed so that you can do it on your own, in your own time: you’ll find all the necessary resources and information on this web page. It can also be helpful to gather a few other people (e.g. members of a prayer group, a parish or ecumenical group …) to do the Retreat together over one calendar week, in which case the group should start together with an initial meeting on Sunday, and then close together with a final meeting the following Sunday. Please contact rector@holycrosshackett.org.au for more advice on doing the Retreat as a group.

You’ll need to set aside about an hour each day for the Retreat in Daily Life. All you’ll need to take part is a quiet corner, a Bible, a notebook … and the desire to deepen your relationship with God and discover the call of Christ for your life.

Before you begin, you will need to watch the two short introductory videos on the Holy Cross YouTube Channel (on “Praying with a Bible Passage” and “Praying the Examen”). Below you’ll find the handouts referred to in the videos, which you can print out – or save on your device – and use as a guide for your prayer during the week.

The programme is then as follows:

  • six 20 minute talks (Monday to Saturday), posted on the Holy Cross YouTube Channel, for you to watch in your own time
  • six 30 minute prayer exercises (introduced at the end of the daily talk), for you to do in your own time
  • a short prayer exercise (the “Examen”), to do at the end of each day

Once you have completed the Retreat:

  1. Please click here to give us your feedback (via Google Forms)
  2. If you would like to make a financial contribution to Holy Cross to support our retreat ministries, please click here for our bank details (and mark your donation “Retreat”)

THANK YOU!

You might also find the following useful:

If you have any questions then feel free to contact rector@holycrosshackett.org.au. Have a good time of prayer!

Walk through our Trinity Labyrinth

At this time many members of our community are self-isolating, in quarantine, or having to stay within their local community. Whether you are unable to visit our site in person, or you are choosing to stay at home for the safety of yourself and our community, the peace of God can offer solace for all pilgrims. We invite you to find rest and renewal in meeting the Creator, the Redeemer and the Spirit as you take a prayerful virtual walk through our Trinity Labyrinth with us.

Sponsor a paver to build our labyrinth

Our Trinity labyrinth at Holy Cross and St Margaret’s is taking shape. You can be a part of it by sponsoring some of the thousand pavers that make it up. At $3 per paver, your contribution can help this beautiful place of prayerfulness grow. Leave a lasting footprint on our sacred land, and help bring the love of God to fellow pilgrims in the Inner North.

Contact treasurer@holycrosshackett.org.au to make a donation.

Mt Majura Trail

Women’s Quiet Time in Fellowship for Lent

Following on from the success of the Advent women’s retreat last year, we are planning another weekend with the same format for Lent. 

Two events will be held to ‘top’ and ‘tail’ a weekend, one Saturday and one Sunday. Women from all walks of life are welcome to attend only one, or both.

Event One Morning Bushwalk – Saturday 20 March, Hackett

7.30 – 9am Bushwalk on Mt Majura reserve. Meet at the Hackett Gate on Grayson Street. Bring a thermos and drink tea with a view!

Event Two Evening Gathering – Sunday 21 March, Holy Cross Church
7pm Evening of contemplative prayer and fellowship, followed by 

8pm Wine and cheese

Contact: admin@holycrosshackett.org.au for more information.

Lent quiet day

Small table with cross, open Bible and candle, in front of Holy Cross altar

Led by Rev’d Joan Smith
“Facing the Unknown: exploring the encounter between Peter and Cornelius, with prayer poems by Eddie Askew”
Tues 9 March, 10am-3pm,
Holy Cross Church Annex.
All welcome.

Morning tea provided; please bring lunch. To sign up, contact Rev’d Joan or the Rector.

Contemplative worship at Holy Cross

Following a challenging year and as the holidays come to a close, our meditative prayer services are returning from 1 Feb, offering a chance to pause amidst busy lives and return our minds to God.

4.15pm Mondays — Meditation Group

5.30pm Tuesdays — Contemplative Evening Prayer and Meditation

Mt Majura Trail

Women’s Retreat done differently – 5&6 December

It’s been quite a year, and more than ever many of us are feeling the vital need – and the significant challenge – of carving out time for fellowship and quiet reflection.

This year, our women’s retreat will, like so many other things, be done a little differently. Join us in a welcoming atmosphere as we spend time together the weekend of 5-6 December:

Saturday 5 December
7.30-9am Bushwalk on Mt Majura reserve (meet at the Hackett Gate on Grayson Street)

Sunday 6 December
7pm Evening of contemplative prayer and fellowship, followed by
8pm Wine and cheese under the cherry tree.

Contemplative Evening Prayer and Meditation

An invitation to take a pause mid-week and invite the Spirit in.

Prayer, “the intentional lifting of the heart and mind to God Father Son and Holy Spirit”, is the most basic Christian activity – and it’s also the key spiritual practice that forms our character as people of faith. At 5.30pm Tuesdays for three weeks from Tuesday 8 September, we will be holding a contemplative evening prayer service as part of our regular worship life. The service will include an invitation to pause in silence for 10 minutes of silent meditation.

All are welcome.

The meaning of our Trinity Labyrinth

Congregations from St Margaret's and Holy Cross gather for the blessing of the Trinity Labyrinth

Labyrinths are an ancient spiritual practice: for many thousands of years, people of all faiths and none have used them for prayer and meditation. In the Middle Ages Christians embraced them as a form of pilgrimage: the most famous one is in Chartres Cathedral, France. A labyrinth is not a maze: you can’t get lost! There’s just one route to follow which always leads to the centre.

Diagram showing the Holy Cross Trinity Labyrinth

The Trinity Labyrinth is unusual in having three centres: the heart, representing the Father; the cross, representing the incarnate Son, Jesus Christ; and the dove, representing the life-giving Holy Spirit. The path that links the centres represents the “divine dance” of love between Father, Son and Spirit, in which we are invited to join. The theological word for this is perichoresis, from the Greek peri-khorein (which also gives us “chorus” & “choreography”).

Unlike some labyrinths which take you on a long journey before reaching the centre, when you enter the Trinity Labyrinth you are welcomed at once to the Father’s heart, and then invited on a pilgrimage into the heart of the love of God.

  • Before you enter the labyrinth, you might want to reflect on a line of Scripture, hold a memory of a loved on you wish to pray for, or consider an experience from your life where you are seeking healing or forgiveness.
  • As you walk the path, moving slowly at your own pace and pausing at the centres, you are invited to experience the love of God who is Father, Son and Holy Spirit, who creates, redeems and sustains you at every moment.
  • When you return to the heart, you can either leave the labyrinth, or – if you have time – choose to continue on your pilgrimage (you might like to walk it three times). There is no right or wrong way to walk a labyrinth.
  • When you leave, take a moment to thank God for what you have received.

Download the labyrinth card with this information here (pdf – 295kb).

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